Five Hot Jobs for a BSN

Hot Jobs for a BSN

• Surgical Nurse

• Pediatric Nurse

• Ambulatory Care Nurse

• Forensic Nurse

• Registered Nurse

An individual interested in a nursing career but unsure of what degree is needed will be happy to know there are many hot jobs for a BSN. The BSN, short for Bachelor of Science in Nursing, is a four-year program that prepares students to become RNs. Once the BSN is completed, the nurse is required to pass the NCLEX-RN so he or she can obtain licensure. Earning the BSN opens many doors for the RN in many healthcare settings. With additional training, the BSN graduate can also work in many specialized nursing areas. Here are five hot jobs for a BSN.

Surgical Nurse

A surgical nurse is an RN who spends the majority of the workday assisting surgeons in surgeries and other medical procedures. While most of the day may be spent inside an operating room, the surgical nurse may also work outside of the operating room assisting in the pre-surgical and post-surgical care. Their duties include taking and monitoring vital signs, prepping the operating room, setting up IVs, discussing the procedure with the patient and talking to the patient's family members. RNs who want to become surgical nurses generally complete a peri-operative nurse training program. According to Nurse Journal, approximately 2 percent of RNs with a BSN become surgical nurses.

Pediatric Nurse

Working as a pediatric nurse is considered very rewarding and is often chosen by the RN with a BSN. The pediatric nurse provides basic nursing care to infants and children until they reach the age of 18. They diagnose and treat diseases, illnesses and injuries while also providing emotional support and comfort to the child. They also speak with the parents and advise them of the child's condition and outcome. To work as a pediatric nurse, the RN must obtain licensure as a Certified Pediatric Nurse by completing required training and passing a certification exam. Pediatric nurses work in private clinics or pediatric wards of hospitals.

Ambulatory Care Nurse

An ambulatory care nurse is an RN who works with patients in settings outside of a hospital, such as clinics or physicians' offices. They treat patients who need routine medical care for chronic and acute illnesses or injuries but do not require hospitalization. Ambulatory care nurses generally work with patients on an outpatient basis. Ambulatory care nurses may choose to work in specific specialized areas such as pediatrics, geriatrics or in women's health. They may also choose to work in areas that deal with specific types of illnesses or injuries. After an RN has two years of RN experience and has completed 2,000 hours of work in ambulatory care, he or she can earn the take the ambulatory care nurse certification exam.

Forensic Nurse

Forensic Nurses care for patients who have suffered trauma and/or are victims of crimes, such as sexual assault, domestic violence and neglect. While forensic nursing is a fairly new field, it has become more well-known since law enforcement began using forensics to help solve crimes. Forensic nurses provide basic medical treatment but also look for indications of foul play and collect evidence for law enforcement. They're trained to tell the difference between basic health issues and those caused by another individual. An RN can become a forensic nurse with a BSN and by completing some continuing education courses. Some forensic nurses obtain certification as Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE nurses).

Registered Nurse

Despite the various hot jobs available with a BSN, some RNs choose to work as registered nurses without specializing in any specific area. To become an RN with a BSN, the individual must complete an approved training program and pass the NCLEX-RN to obtain licensure, which is required in all the states. Some RNs who have worked for several years may advance to leadership positions such as nurse manager, staff nurse or head nurse. Registered nurses can be found in clinics, hospitals, outpatient clinics, government public health offices and schools.

Related Resource: The 25 Best Bachelors in Nursing Online Degree Programs for 2018

Registered nurses will continue to be in demand as the aging population continues to require good healthcare and current RNs reach retirement age. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that RNs can expect a job growth of up to 15 percent from 2016-2026. By obtaining the training, RNs can find many hot jobs with a BSN.