Five High-Paying Jobs in Supply Chain and Logistics

High-Paying Jobs in Supply Chain and Logistics

  • Distribution Center Manager
  • Fleet Manager
  • Business Operations Specialist
  • Configuration Analyst
  • Senior Level Landman

Jobs in supply chain and logistics have been around, in one form or another, since humans first settled down and developed agriculture. The more specialized our society becomes, with one person providing for a specific need shared by hundreds or thousands of others, the larger the supply industry's role becomes. That role is already big enough that many people, including industry professionals, don't fully comprehend how much opportunity it affords to recent college graduates.

Here are five high-paying job opportunities of which you might not have been aware, within the supply industry:

Distribution Center Manager

Commercial distribution companies don't transport goods from point A to point B directly. Instead, they pass through hubs, which organize and refine the process. These distribution centers demand a strong background in logistics and materials handling, and may service a wide range of businesses and industries. A distribution center's manager is required to ensure that things stay organized on-site, and to handle the plant's day-to-day operations. This is a demanding but rewarding position, with an opening salary expectation of about $80,000 per year.

Fleet Manager

A fleet manager works for a commercial shipping business, overseeing the maintenance and scheduling concerns of the company's motor vehicles, and ensuring compliance with all Department of Transportation regulations. Instead of being hands-on, the fleet manager is largely administrative, making sure that every driver is able to get to where they need to be in a timely fashion. Logistical skills are required for this position, and a relevant degree can help with snaring that optimum starting salary of a little more than $71,000 per year.

Business Operations Specialist

This career path encompasses a broad range of occupations and skill sets, any of which are improved through the existence of a strong logistical focus. A specialist in business operations may be in charge of planning business strategies, negotiating with customs officials on behalf of an international corporation, implementing security measures, or auditing the effectiveness of a business's sustainability initiatives. With a relevant logistics degree, the professional operations specialist can expect to demand a starting salary of $74,000 or more per year, with a strong foundation for their own independent consulting enterprise down the road.

Configuration Analyst

In engineering, a configuration analyst oversees changes to relevant technical documents for high-tech equipment. They are often responsible for the timely completion of important projects, within established budgetary constraints. This job requires both logistical skills and the relevant technical skills of the industry concerned, but it's a fast-track to an administrative position, which adds the responsibility of establishing standards and protocols by which complex engineering procedures may be changed (as opposed to implementing changes). Once you're at that point, you can expect a median salary of more than $120,000 per year, and you are positioned for a highly rewarding career as a consultant within a niche industry.

Senior Level Landman

At the pre-administrative level, this job offers a median salary of approximately $115,000 per year. It is concerned with land rights, including the existing ownership of places of interest, and their availability for purchase or lease. A landman is also responsible for negotiating agreements for land use, and for the extraction of valuable resources. At the senior level, this position incorporates the assurance of compliance with all relevant government agencies; this is approximately halfway up the career ladder, with additional steps incorporating a higher salary and greater responsibility.

For More Information

For the majority of jobs in supply chain and logistics, opportunities begin in the private sector, with public, academic and government work often being predicated on existing experience. This may seem restrictive, but it allows prospective supply management professionals to narrow their focus while looking for that initial opportunity.

Related Resource: The 20 Best Online Master's in Supply Chain Management Programs