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Bottoms Up: 8 Great Drinking Games

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Bottoms Up: Eight Great Drinking Games

BestCollegeReviews.org has taken a look at some of the most classic drinking games of all time. Here are eight that will make any party a good time. Drink responsibly!

Edward 40 Hands

AKA: 80 Ounces to Freedom and the 40 Challenge

Rules: Players duct tape a 40-ounce beer to each of their hands and may not free their hands until their beers are empty. Need to check a text on your phone? Too bad. Need to use the bathroom? That’s really too bad. House rules differ as to whether players must drink BOTH bottles before removing the tape, or whether they can free one hand at a time. And punishment for those who can’t finish also varies but can include the player having to pour the beer all over themselves.

History: Possibly created after a crafty drinker saw the 1990 Johnny Depp classic “Edward Scissorhands” and thought, “But what if his hands were booze?!”

What you’ll need: 40s, tape, a strong bladder

Tips: Don’t drink any other liquids before playing this game, use the bathroom before you start, and pace yourself.

Flip Cup

AKA: Cups, Taps, Flippy Cup, Tippy Cup

Rules: Two teams with an equal number of players stand on opposite sides of a table. In front of each player is a plastic cup with a set amount of beer (the amount varies by house rules-and who poured it). At the beginning, the first member on each team drinks his or her beer. They then place their empty cup at the edge of the table, face-up, and using a quick, one-touch motion, attempt to flip the cup over so that it lands face-down on the table. When a player successfully flips his cup, the turn passes to the next player on his team. The first team to successfully flip all their cups is the winner.

History: According to some drinking game aficionados, the game was invented by college students in Hoboken, New Jersey, in 1987. Whatever its origins, the game has spread and now includes pay-to-play tournaments around the country, even the World Series of Flip Cup.

What you’ll need: At least six players, plastic cups, a table that you don’t care that much about, beer

Tips: Ensure that your opponent has a challenge flipping his cup by “accidentally” spilling a little beer on his side of the table so his cup is tougher to flip.

Beer Pong

AKA: Beirut

Rules: Two two-to-four player teams take turns throwing pingpong balls at a triangle of cups on their opponents’ side of the table. If a ball lands in a cup, the contents are consumed by the other team and the cup is placed aside or reinserted, empty, into the triangle. If a member of the opposing team throws a ball into an empty cup, they must drink one of their own cups. The first to eliminate all of the opponent’s cups is the winner.

History: The game may have its origins in a beer pong played with paddles by the fraternities of Dartmouth in the 1950s and 1960s. Some communities in the U.S. have attempted to ban the game from being played outdoors for health concerns, both over binge drinking and the spread of diseases such as herpes and mononucleosis.

What you’ll need: Between four and eight people, plastic cups, beer, pingpong balls, a table

Tips: Keep your fingers dry. If house rules don’t ban them, employ distractions to fluster your opponents.

Quarters

AKA: Moose (variation that includes bouncing quarters into an ice tray)

Rules: A cup (either empty or filled with alcohol) is placed in the middle of a table, at least 10 inches away from all the players. Players take turns bouncing a quarter off the table and into the cup. If successful, the player makes another player drink and gets to take another turn (variations include the player to the left of the shooter drinking). Players determine in advance how much constitutes a “drink.”

History: Unknown but is one of the oldest drinking games and remains popular today

What you’ll need: Hard table, quarter, cups, beer (or other alcohol)

Tips: If your house rules call for the shooter to choose the drinker, beware of revenge-don’t choose the same player to drink every time you’re shooting.

King’s Cup

AKA: Circle of Death, Ring of Fire, Waterfall, Donut

Rules: Players sit in a circle around a table. A beer cup is placed on the table, and a deck of cards is spread out, face-down, around the cup. Players take turns flipping over cards and must drink or watch others drink based on the value of the card. For instance, in some variations, if a player turns over a 5, all women at the table must drink. If a player turns over an 8, the table must go into a round of “Never Have I Ever.” If a player flips over a King, they must pour the contents of their drink into the King Cup at the center of the table, and the last player to flip a King must chug the King Cup. House rules are important, as everyone must know what to do when each card is turned over. The game ends when all cards have been flipped.

History: Unknown, but the game is popular among college students all over the world.

What you’ll need: Lots of people, a deck of cards, a table and plenty of beer

Tips: Just try to remember what the cards mean.

Power Hour

AKA: Variation includes Century Club (a shot a minute for 100 minutes)

Rules: The rules are simple: Drink 60 shots of beer in one hour-one shot per minute. Many websites exist to help players through the game by creating a one-hour playlist; simply drink when you hear a new song. House rules can penalize players for not finishing.

History: Some claim the game originated in upstate New York.

What you’ll need: About six beers per person, shot glasses

Tips: As you’ll be drinking the equivalent of a six pack in one hour, just try to stay on your feet (or in your seat).

Three Man

AKA: Mr. Three, Hat Man

Rules: Each person takes a roll at the dice; the first to roll a 1 and a 2 is designated the Three Man, and any time a 3 comes up, the Three Man has to drink. Other actions are assigned to different dice totals, including making the players to the left and right of the roller drink and making everybody drink. If another player rolls a 1 and a 2, they become the Three Man. In some house rules, if the Three Man himself rolls a 1 and a 2, he gets to choose who becomes the next Three Man. In some variations, the Three Man is forced to wear a special hat (often an empty beer case).

History: Unknown

What you’ll need: A pair of dice, at least six people (larger groups mean less drinking)

Tips: Learn the rules of the house and try to retain you motor control as you get drunker.

SOURCES

barwhiz.com
drunkt.com
Urban Dictionary

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